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Posts Tagged ‘Problem Management’

Continual Service Improvement (CSI)

December 8th, 2010

Most IT organizations, if asked would say that they ‘continuously improve’; however there is a gap between saying it and being able to demonstrate that it exists.

For CSI to work in the long term, a culture of improvement needs to be instilled within IT. 

If the culture of improvement does not exist, the first step is to identify improvement behaviours and perform them consistently and repeatedly (let’s call the identification of these behaviours; performance tweaks).

Overtime these behaviours will begin to take root and become part of ITs fabric, impacting every project that is taken on board.

What is CSI?

Simple Behavioural Steps

For an organization who wants to get started with Service Improvement, there are some simple behavioural steps that can be followed to get started:

#1 Baseline your current performance (pick an area you suspect there could be an opportunity to improve upon and measure what you are doing today),

#2 Analyze your performance data and build a list of wins based on cost/technical complexity and benefit (this is key, as the organization will resist change unless you have the numbers to back up the benefit),

#3 Identify a group of people within the organization that need to be involved to address the issue you identified,

#4 Set a realistic meaningful goal and timeframe,

#5 Implement the agreed performance tweak, into your environment

#6 Track and measure how performance is changing with the performance tweak in place,

#7 Report on your success and set a new goal to sustain your improvement,

#8 Repeat this process for something new!

The key is to focus your initial performance tweaks on something that won’t cost a lot of money to change, but can provide a big impact.

If you follow this process just once a month, you will be taking the necessary steps of instilling the culture of improvement within your IT department.

About Us (ThinkITSM Corp.)

ThinkITSM Corp. manufactures tools that help organizations implement practical CSI initiatives within their organization. Our service (which we call ITSM Coach) takes a snapshot of your current service desk performance and baselines some key measures.

We help you learn how to analyze the information you gather in your service management tools to inform service improvement goal setting and help you establish internal changes necessary to meet your desired goals.

We make many of our tools available for use at no charge and you can get started today with a free baseline assessment of your Incident, Problem and Change processes.

To learn more click here…

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Charles Cyna Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , , ,

Signs that a Service Management Initiative has Stalled

November 8th, 2010

Continual Service Improvement is the fuel that provides long term momentum for any Service Management initiative. The fuel of momentum is vital; great IT Service Delivery is a journey that can take months and sometimes years to reach the productivity and cost savings that were sold at the beginning of a project. 

Many Service Management initiatives stall soon after the beginning because, as we try to achieve efficiencies we generate organizational resistance (the human condition is that most of us resist change) and if we don’t have the ammunition to overcome the resistance then the project stalls, inertia overtakes and the Service Management initiative never has the opportunity to reach its potential.

Signs that a Service Management Initiative has Stalled:

You implemented a Service Management tool a few years ago and you have not performed any significant customizations to the tool since it was implemented;

You implemented a couple of practice areas (Incident, Problem, Change) but have not been able to move much beyond those areas due to time and cost restraints;

You did a Process Maturity Assessment over a year ago and have not completed a re-assessment to measure the differences over time;

You generate reports for management but there are no defined ‘next steps’  to improve service after looking at the information;

You survey your customers but do little with the results of the survey;

You are not sure what the business outcomes are for a successful ITIL or ITSM Practice;

And if you do know the business outcomes, you are not sure whether you are meeting them.

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Charles Cyna Uncategorized , , , , , , , , ,

Keeping IT Real– risks of low maturity in incident, problem & change.

October 22nd, 2009

Risks for Organizations with Maturity less then Level 3

There are risks for organizations that operate in the Level 1-2 maturity range. If there is a plan to develop and mature the practice(s) to level 3 or higher the risks are somewhat mitigated. However, while at a level 0-2 some of the key risks to consider are:

Service Desk and Incident Management

  • Perception of IT as a whole is lowered and considered not customer focused
  • There is a danger of negatively impacting external customers and their perception of the business
  • There are costs (financial, reputational) when the business is interrupted while users and major services are down
  • There is an inefficient use of skilled IT technical resources
  • There is little incident reporting data because most of it is inaccurate and consequently little basis for improvement
  • Many of the same incidents are resolved repeatedly (re-inventing the wheel)
  • There will be a risk of high Staff burnout and high turnover of support staff

Change Management

  • The infrastructure is very unstable and has long term performance issues
  • There are frequent outages following unauthorized changes
  • Project implementations are delayed because changes cannot be coordinated
  • There are many failed changes that cause incidents
  • The requirement for changes outstrips the capacity to implement them
  • Support for third party applications expires due to inability to stay current

Problem Management

  • Common incidents are resolved repeatedly, lowering customer satisfaction and inflating support costs unnecessarily
  • Re-inventing the wheel when sporadic incidents occur over longer periods of time
  • Frequent interruptions or degradation of service
  • It is difficult to introduce new services when unknown errors may jeopardize the implementation.
  • The change practice gets bogged down due to higher rates of failed changes
  • Due to a lack of work around information the Service Desk regresses to a call dispatch function.
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Maria Ritchie Uncategorized , , , , , , ,